Single Charge Dropped in Harvey Weinstein Sex Assault Case

Irene MckinneyOct 12, 2018

The judge agreed to dismiss the lone charge in the case related to aspiring actress Lucia Evans who helped launch the #MeToo movement. That came after the Manhattan D.A.'s office slapped him with additional and more damning sex crime charges on July 2.

In an expose published in The New Yorker past year, Evans accused Weinstein of forcing her to perform oral sex when they met alone in his office in 2004 to discuss her fledgling acting career.

About six months later, prosecutors interviewed the pal, who said that she was with Evans at a Manhattan bar in the summer of 2004 when Weinstein offered the women "cash if they exposed their breasts to him". Weinstein's lawyer Ben Brafman asked the judge to review all of the detective's work, but the judge has yet to respond to that request.

The judge also released a letter from the district attorney's office to Brafman.

The New York City Police Department said in a statement it "remains fully confident in the overall case it has pursued against Mr. Weinstein".

But Evans' attorney said the decision does not "invalidate the truth of her claims".

The letter also said prosecutors had recently obtained an email that Evans wrote in 2015 to the man she later married.

His lawyer, Benjamin Brafman, said he would seek to have the remaining charges dismissed as well.

Brafman added that he believed a NYPD detective attempted to influence the case by encouraging the witness to remain quiet about inconsistencies, according to the Washington Post. Outside court, he suggested Evans should be prosecuted for perjury.

Evidence has been found, according to the defense, that Evans sent several emails indicating that the sex act was consensual and the two carried on an affair for many years, WCBS 880's Marla Diamond reported.

Weinstein, who has denied all allegations of non-consensual sex, still faces charges over allegations that he raped an unidentified woman in his hotel room in 2013 and performed a forcible sex act on a different woman in 2006. If found guilty, the much accused co-founder of The Weinstein Company could spend the rest of his life in prison.

The movie mogul's fabled career imploded after he was hit by a tidal wave of lurid allegations relating to the rape and sexual of a large number of women.

Manhattan's district attorney dropped part of the criminal case against Weinstein on Thursday.

Harvey Weinstein appeared without handcuffs in New York Supreme Court this morning and even flashed a faint smile, a big change from his previous sober and shackled appearances in his sexual assault trial.

An attorney for Evans said she is very disappointed that the prosecution decided not to oppose the defense motion to dismiss the count.

New York Police officials poured on the pressure, too, saying publicly they believed they had gathered ample evidence to make an arrest.

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